Vitiligo

Our team of professionals and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well-being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics, which can be found on the side of each page under Patient Education. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you.

As always, you can contact our office with questions or concerns.

Vitiligo: Overview

Vitiligo: This skin disease often forms on both sides of the body as shown here on the knees.

Vitiligo (vit-uh-lie-go) causes the skin to lose color. Patches of lighter skin appear. Some people develop a few patches. Others lose much more skin color.

Vitiligo usually affects the skin, but it can develop anywhere we have pigment. Patches of hair can turn white. Some people lose color inside their mouths. Even an eye can lose some of its color.

  vitiligo_landing.jpg
Vitiligo: This skin disease often forms on both sides of the body as shown here on the knees.
Vitiligo is not contagious. It is not life-threatening. But, vitiligo can be life-altering. Some people develop low self-esteem. They may no longer want to hang out with friends or develop serious depression. Most people have vitiligo for life, so it’s important to develop coping strategies.

A coping strategy that helps many people is to learn about vitiligo. Another helpful strategy is to connect with others who have vitiligo.

Image used with permission of the American Academy of Dermatology National Library of Dermatologic Teaching Slides.

References:
Gawkrodger DJ, Ormerod AD, Shaw L et al. Guideline for the diagnosis and management of vitiligo. Br J Dermatol 2008; 159: 1051-76.
Nicolaidou E, Antoniou C, Stratigos A et al. Narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy and 308-nm excimer laser in the treatment of vitiligo: a review. J Am Acad Dermatol 2009; 60: 470-7.
Whitton ME, Ashcroft DM, Gonzalez U. Therapeutic interventions for vitiligo. J Am Acad Dermatol 2008; 59: 713-7.


© American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. Use of these materials is subject to the legal notice and terms of use located at https://www.aad.org/about/legal


Contact Us

No medical diagnoses or decision making to be made through this electronic communication.

Ventura County Dermatology

2438 N. Ponderosa Dr. C-105Camarillo, CA 93010
1700 N. Rose Ave Suite 450 Oxnard, CA 93030